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Unlock Your Potential With Yoga Nidra

Born and raised in the West, where it is believed that more effort must be exerted to create and attain success, the ideas behind Yoga Nidra can be confusing.


Lying on one's back, seemingly not doing anything yet still being able to manifest more, reach higher heights and even improve life quality appears to be a paradox.

Yoga Nidra is actually a profound ancient yogic practice. In the West, yoga is usually seen as an exercise in which specific postures (“asanas”) are followed and there are many types of yoga such as Vinyasa, Ashtanga, Hatha, Yin, Iyengar and Kundalini.


There are in fact “eight limbs” of yoga, only one of which is active postures. A yogic lifestyle includes more passive practices like non-violence, meditation and austerity. Yoga Nidra is a more spiritual, meditative, restorative practice where minimal body movements are involved. It is therefore accessible to everyone. Yoga Nidra provides a complement to and balance for those with a physical practice, even expert practitioners as its intention is very different.


Posture-centric yoga is designed to move energy through the body while allowing the mind to become more focused. It’s original purpose was to prepare the mind and body for practices such as meditation. Yoga Nidra, specifically I AM Yoga Nidra, is a series of breath and awareness techniques that take you into the same space that meditation does, but with less effort and discipline. While the ultimate goal may be knowing one’s true self, the physical, mental and emotional benefits derived from a Yoga Nidra practice are just the antidote we need for living in today’s stress-filled world.

I recently had the opportunity to sit down with Lynn Matthews, a Yoga Nidra teacher, yogi with more than 4,000 hours of training and 9,000 hours of teaching experience, and ask her a few questions


What initially piqued your interest in Yoga Nidra?

I was exposed to Yoga Nidra decades ago and loved the practice for its simplicity and its profound, often immediate, impact.


Are there any visible outcomes you have experienced or noticed from teaching or participating in Yoga Nidra?